Tag Archives: Pineland Farms

Patti’s Aug. 31 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Cyclists start off on the Farm to Fork Fondo Aug.25 at Pineland’s Valley Farm in New Gloucester. In the event, riders stop for chef-prepared cuisine at farms along the course, choosing which distances they want to complete.

Buy an apple pie

The annual New Gloucester Historical Society apple pie sale will be held on Friday, Sept. 21. Local Thompson’s apples will be transformed into culinary classics created by local bakers.

Pre-orders are required, so call Avis Ford at 926-4561 to reserve your pie(s). Pick-up is between 2-6 p.m. at the NG Congregational Church vestry, 19 Gloucester Hill Road. This fundraiser is a fall tradition.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to: http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-150/

 

Patti’s Aug. 17 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Jenny Smick and Kyle Hardy with 2-year-old son Augustus take a rest break in the History Barn near the portion of the current exhibit featuring properties in the Webber District of New Gloucester. They moved into town about a year ago and reside on the Morse Road about halfway between the Webber District and White’s Corner.

Maine Native American Market

The 10th annual festival of Maine’s finest, award-winning Native American artists will be held from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 25, at Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village, 707 Shaker Road. The Maine Native American Summer Market provides a rare opportunity to purchase museum-quality crafts directly from Maine’s finest Wabanaki artists. A wide selection of crafts is offered for a range of prices from a few dollars to several hundred dollars. Cash or personal checks are accepted by all of the artists.

More than 40 members of the Penobscot, Passamaquoddy, Micmac and Maliseet tribes will demonstrate traditional Wabanaki art forms including basket making, stone carving, bark etching, beadwork and jewelry, in addition to featured performances of drumming, singing, dancing and storytelling by the Burnurwurbskek Singers and Dancers from the Penobscot Nation. This is the southernmost gathering of Wabanaki artists in the state of Maine. Don’t miss this rare opportunity to learn about and experience first-hand Maine’s Native American culture.

Barbecue dinner plates will be for sale to the public, while supplies last. Admission is free, and the event will occur rain or shine.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column, go to: http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-149/

 

Patti’s Aug. 3 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Joanne Mason, of Hanover, who is a Maine Adaptive Sports & Recreation multi-season volunteer, practices backhand drills last week during wheelchair tennis lessons at Pineland Farms’ courts.

Wheelchair tennis at Pineland

Maine Adaptive provides year-round programs promoting adaptive sports and recreation for those with disabilities ages 4 and up who live in or visit Maine. All of the lessons and programs are free of charge for participants.

Staff members and volunteers offer wheelchair and stand-up tennis drills and match play at Pineland Farms and Gould Academy as one of their summer programs. Competitors don’t need to have their own equipment. Maine Adaptive has equipment to fit many shapes and sizes.

One of the wheelchair tennis programs occurred at the courts at Pineland Farms on July 27. John Pelletier, of Westport, Massachusetts, who owns a camp in the town of Denmark, said that he has been playing and teaching wheelchair tennis for several years. He instructs participants by starting with forehand and backhand drills, then progressing into service practice. After these disciplines are performed, the players break into groups to compete in match play.

Brandon Merry, Maine Adaptive program manager, said wheelchair tennis takes place in collaboration with the Veterans Adaptive Sports & Training program at Pineland Farms since some of the Maine Adaptive participants are veterans. The upcoming schedule for wheelchair tennis at Pineland Farms is Monday, Aug. 6; Friday, Aug. 24; and Friday, Sept. 14.”

Those interested in competing or volunteering can check Guidelines for Participation at maineadaptive.org. The necessary forms are posted there as well. For more information, call Maine Adaptive’s office at (800) 639-7770.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to: http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-148/

 

Patti’s July 20 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Cumberland County Sheriff’s Deputy Al Winslow talks about his experiences with his K-9 partner Ruk at the New Gloucester Public Library’s Pet Show on July 10. They graduated from the Maine Criminal Justice Academy in June 2013 having been trained in tracking, building sweeps, evidence and article searches, officer protection and suspect apprehension.

Library Players casting call

Calling all thespians! The New Gloucester Public Library, 379 Intervale Road, will be conducting a casting call at 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 24, for this year’s play. Every child who wants a part is guaranteed one, and there will be speaking and non-speaking roles available.

The Library Players will present their performance on Tuesday, Aug. 14, at 6:30 p.m. If acting isn’t your thing, come support the young actors as an audience member. Call Suzan or Carla at 926-4840 for more details.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-147/

 

Patti’s July 6 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Nadia Schmock shows off her chicken at the New Gloucester Public Library’s Pet Show last year. Pet owners and their critters of all types are invited to participate in this year’s event scheduled for Tuesday, July 10, at 6:30 p.m. Courtesy photo by SallyAnn Rogers

16th annual Pet Show

Would you like to show off your beloved animal and meet other interesting pets?

Come to the New Gloucester Public Library, 379 Intervale Road at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, July 10, for their 16th annual Pet Show.

All pets are welcome to attend for socializing with other friendly pets and their owners. Light refreshments will be served. A representative from the GNG Animal Hospital will be on hand for a fun presentation. An additional exciting canine visitor will be in attendance to provide entertainment and education. Pre-registration is appreciated.

For more information, call Carla at 926-4840.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-146/

 

Patti’s May 11 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Serenity Klotzle, 7, who belongs to the New Gloucester Public Library’s 4-H group, covers the root ball of a newly planted Liberty Elm tree that she named “Elmie” on April 29. Her 5-year-old sister Haven looks on.

Liberty Elm takes root

The image of majestic elm trees arching over the streets of our hometowns changed significantly in the 1930s when Dutch elm disease decimated the elm population. Because of efforts by the nonprofit Elm Research Institute, disease-resistant trees have been developed. They have been given the moniker of the American Liberty Elm — named for the “Liberty Tree,” our country’s first symbol of freedom. The institute established its Liberty Tree Society program in 2009, and of the hundreds of thousands elms they have planted, 99 percent have survived.

New Gloucester Public Library purchased an elm from the Liberty Tree Society in Keene, New Hampshire. Trustee Robb Cotiaux traveled there to pick up the tree for planting, and he along with library 4-H member Serenity Klotzle installed the sapling on April 29. “Elmie” can be visited behind the gazebo and swing set.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to: http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-142/

 

 

Patti’s April 13 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Ice out in the Pineland Pond can’t come quickly enough for these mallards enjoying a brisk swim alongside a frozen slab on April 5. Photo by Patti Mikkelsen

“Fueling Our Schools”

Customers of the Circle K convenience store at 255 Shaker Road in Gray are invited to a special Fuel Up Night to kick off Circle K’s annual “Fueling Our Schools” fundraising campaign. The ongoing campaign invites customers to purchase fuel at specially marked pumps, with Circle K donating one cent of every gallon of fuel purchased to Gray-New Gloucester High School, up to $2,000. The school will use its donation to address different areas of need, such as technology, resources, teacher incentives and more.

On Thursday, April 19, a special Fuel Up Night, customers will have an opportunity to make an even greater impact. From 3-8 p.m., 10 cents of each gallon of fuel sold at pumps seven and eight will be donated to Gray-New Gloucester High School.

“Circle K is passionate about giving back to the neighborhoods where we work and live,” said Jeff Burrell, vice president of Global Fuels. “Through this unique fundraising program, we are helping to address critical needs and enabling educators to make a difference in the classroom and beyond.”

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-140/

Patti’s March 16 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Shaker Village workshops

The Shakers are among the best-known craftspeople in American history; their legacy includes fine examples of woodworking, textile arts, basket making, metalwork, music, gardening, cooking, and more. Learn age-old crafts and modern spins on their tradition from local artisans and makers. All workshops take place at Shaker Village, working in historic buildings with serene views all around; learning about and carrying on the traditional crafts of the Shakers and our region.

The list of workshops and events to be held at Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village during their 2018 season, starting Memorial Day weekend, can be found at www.maineshakers.com. Pre-registration is required for all workshop classes. Register online, by phone 926-4597, or by mail addressed to United Society of Shakers, 707 Shaker Road, New Gloucester, ME 04260.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to: http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-138/

 

Patti’s Feb. 2 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Veterans monument update

The New Gloucester Historical Society, assisted by many people, established a “Veterans Honor Roll” with more than 875 names of veterans with ties to New Gloucester, starting with the Revolutionary War up to present day.

To add a veteran’s name to the monument or to purchase an engraved brick, obtain a form at the Town Hall, email Jean Libby at jelibby8@maine.rr.com, or write the New Gloucester Historical Society, P.O. Box 531, New Gloucester, ME 04260. The deadline is Wednesday, Feb. 28.

Neighborhood nostalgia

The next monthly meeting of the New Gloucester Historical Society will feature a workshop for all members and friends who are interested in researching their New Gloucester neighborhood and/or historic home. The research will be used in a major new exhibit opening in May 2018. The workshop will be held on Thursday, Feb. 15, 7 p.m. at the New Gloucester Meetinghouse, 389 Intervale Road. Refreshments will be served.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-feb-2/

 

Patti’s Jan. 19 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Nearly 100 enthusiasts hiked the loop trail to the summit of Pisgah Hill atthe Royal River Conservation Trust’s annual Full Moon Trek last February. This year’s trek is scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 1.

Full moon trek

Join Royal River Conservation Trust Thursday, Feb. 1, from 5-8 p.m. for a free self-guided hike and celebratory gathering atop 325-foot Pisgah Hill.

Kyle Warren, the RRCT staff member leading the hike says, “The full moon rises at sunset the day before, so expect to bask in the silver glow about an hour after sunset. It usually works out perfectly to enjoy the moonlight on your hike from the bonfire. It is a really unique and empowering experience to enjoy the woods at night.”

This seventh annual event is free and accessible to those with snowshoeing experience. All the fun happens at Pisgah Hill Preserve, south trailhead, 74 Dougherty Road, near the Pownal town line.

Last February nearly 100 RRCT members, neighbors, trustees, toddlers, grandparents and friends hiked the loop trail through a perfect amount of new snow, shared some cheer at the summit, toasted with hot cocoa, toasted marshmallows, and hooted at the big orange rising moon.

The trail is well marked and typically lighted with luminaries for the return. Organizers recommend bringing snowshoes, poles, a flashlight or headlamp, blanket, water and lots of good cheer. The trailhead has a small parking lot which fills quickly. Most vehicles are asked to line the shoulder of Dougherty Road. For more details, call 632-6112.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-135/