Tag Archives: agriculture

Volunteers repair Shakers’ hayfield

About 40 volunteers from as far away as Georgia spent the wet morning filling in ruts caused by vandals driving an automobile in circles two weeks ago.

“It’s a cold, wet day and we have a field full of people,” said Michael Graham, curator of the Shaker museum. Keep reading

Shaker Village Harvest Festival

Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village will host its annual Harvest Festival on Saturday, October 6th from 10am – 4:30pm. Bring your family and friends for a day of free barn tours by Brother Arnold Hadd, free wagon rides, and special activities. Freshly-picked apples from the historic Shaker orchards will be offered for sale along with cider-pressing of Shaker apples, homemade Shaker apple and pumpkin donuts, BBQ dinner plates, and much more!

Live Bluegrass music by Albert Price and the Pseudonyms. Chipman’s Farm, neighbors to the Shakers since the 1790s, will have a fresh bounty of seasonal produce for sale, along with preserves and baked goods. Maple syrup and maple candy will be sold by Passamaquoddy Maple from Jackman, Maine. Seasonal mums, other late-season “bloomers” and houseplants will be available from Donna’s Greenhouse.

Free, traditional craft demonstrations include wool fiber spinning, rug hooking and supplies by Parris House Wool Works, blacksmithing by Tim Greene, weaving by Marjie Thompson, wood-turning by Peter Asselyn, and woodcarving by the Poland Woodcarvers. Book signings by Don Perkins — The Barns of Maine, and Chris Becksvoort — The Shaker Legacy. Native American artists and crafters including Lightning Hawk Creations, dolls by Wendy Hamilton, and Passamaquoddy Maple syrup and sugar.

Free wagon rides will be offered throughout the day with free tours of the Shaker Herb Garden. Free face painting for kids along with free gourd decorating! Rain or shine – all activities will be in the Shakers’ historic 1830 barns. The Museum is open for tours as well as the Shaker Store and Museum Gift Shop. Bring the family!

Saving seeds for next year’s garden?

Fall is a busy time of year for farmers who need to harvest the last of the season’s crops and work on preparing the soil for next year. But Roberta Bailey of Seven Tree Farm in Vassalboro is occupied with something else, too: saving seeds from this year’s crop.

Keep reading

Merribrook Farm fields to Maine Farmland Trust


On September 11th, a portion of our family farm on Intervale Road, New Gloucester was sold to Maine Farmland Trust to be forever farm fields. Our parents Lowell (“Brookie)” and Barbara Brookings bought the farm on Intervale Road in 1944. Dad had a herd of Holstein cows that he milked up until the summer of 1979 and sold the milk to Oakhurst Dairy. They also raised vegetables and Mom took them to the Portland Public Market until 1950.  Many of the neighborhood boys and a few girls, worked in the summer helping to bring the hay in. After the milking herd was sold to an Amish farmer in Lancaster County Pennsylvania, Dad still had young stock for a while. Dad hayed the fields up into his late 80’s, and sold the hay to people with horses, sheep, cows etc.  We 6 “kids” all helped with the haying, the gardens, the cows and whatever else needed to be done. Our brother Gary, the youngest and only boy, worked the farm with a Dad for many years. Some of the grandchildren also had the experience of helping on the farm, especially with the haying. One of our parents wishes was that it stay a farm forever if at all possible. By selling to Maine Farmland Trust, that is going to be possible on a good portion of the land. Some is going to be kept in the family which they had also wanted. The fields can now be enjoyed by the people that pass by Merribrook Farm forever.

Barbie Seaver

Patti’s Aug. 31 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Cyclists start off on the Farm to Fork Fondo Aug.25 at Pineland’s Valley Farm in New Gloucester. In the event, riders stop for chef-prepared cuisine at farms along the course, choosing which distances they want to complete.

Buy an apple pie

The annual New Gloucester Historical Society apple pie sale will be held on Friday, Sept. 21. Local Thompson’s apples will be transformed into culinary classics created by local bakers.

Pre-orders are required, so call Avis Ford at 926-4561 to reserve your pie(s). Pick-up is between 2-6 p.m. at the NG Congregational Church vestry, 19 Gloucester Hill Road. This fundraiser is a fall tradition.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to: http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-150/

 

Farmers Market at Fairgrounds starts September 1

A new farmers market is coming to the updated New Gloucester Fairgrounds next month.

Parks and Recreation Committee member Kathleen Potter has taken the lead on  the new market, with help from Town Manager Carrie Castonguay. Keep reading

New Gloucester Farmers Market opening Sept. 1

Something exciting will be happening in New Gloucester beginning on Saturday, Sept. 1. The New Gloucester Farmers Market will be held at the New Gloucester Fairgrounds on Saturdays, Sept. 1 through Oct. 13 from 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m.

If you would like more information and/or are interested in being a vendor at the market, contact Market Coordinator, Kathleen Potter, at 712-4738 or farmersmarket@newgloucester.com.

Patti’s May 11 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Serenity Klotzle, 7, who belongs to the New Gloucester Public Library’s 4-H group, covers the root ball of a newly planted Liberty Elm tree that she named “Elmie” on April 29. Her 5-year-old sister Haven looks on.

Liberty Elm takes root

The image of majestic elm trees arching over the streets of our hometowns changed significantly in the 1930s when Dutch elm disease decimated the elm population. Because of efforts by the nonprofit Elm Research Institute, disease-resistant trees have been developed. They have been given the moniker of the American Liberty Elm — named for the “Liberty Tree,” our country’s first symbol of freedom. The institute established its Liberty Tree Society program in 2009, and of the hundreds of thousands elms they have planted, 99 percent have survived.

New Gloucester Public Library purchased an elm from the Liberty Tree Society in Keene, New Hampshire. Trustee Robb Cotiaux traveled there to pick up the tree for planting, and he along with library 4-H member Serenity Klotzle installed the sapling on April 29. “Elmie” can be visited behind the gazebo and swing set.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to: http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-142/

 

 

Pineland Farms Dairy moving to Bangor

Two 65-foot-long tractor trailer trucks maneuvering the tight turn from Hammond Street into Bangor’s Hildreth North Business Park in early April had folks buzzing at nearby Chase’s Family Restaurant.

Each truck carried a silo that could hold 30,000 gallons of milk. Keep reading

Photos by Sara Gray, Maine Barns in Winter

A collection of photos celebrating the beauty of barns in winter at Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village, Intervale Farm, Morgan Hill Farm and the Morin Farm by photographer Sara Gray appears in New England Today.