Fishermens Net Memorial Day weekend specials

Happy Memorial Day Weekend!! With this marking the kick-off to summer, we are happy to announce that our lobster specials are BACK!

Chics: $8.99/lb or 5 for $45
Quarters: $9.99/lb or 5 for $55
Halves: $10.99/lb or 5 for $75
Jumbos!!! $12.99/lb
We have Grouper, Swordfish, Tuna, Mako Shark, Scallops, Salmon, Haddock……
Great Take-out special this weekend for 1 1-1/4# lobster, 1# steamers and Fries for $19.99.
Come on by! We would be so happy to see you!!!
Stay safe and have a great weekend!
Nikki

Confederate flag “not coming down”

The owner of a New Gloucester farm stand who flies a Confederate flag in honor of family that lives in the South says recent attention over it has been good for his bottom line.

Charlie Verrill owns Will & Laineys – a farm stand and greenhouse business started by his parents on Lewiston Road.

“I just put it there … it’s an attraction to try to get business,” he said, adding that following a recent story aired by TV station WMTW, he’s had people come to New Gloucester just to shake his hand. Keep reading

“Rooting for Democracy” Plant Sale on June 2

The 2017 “Rooting for Democracy” plant sale, sponsored by the New Gloucester Democratic Committee, is just opening for business. Courtesy photo by Julie Fralich

The 11th annual “Rooting for Democracy” plant sale, sponsored by the New Gloucester Democratic Committee, will be held on Saturday, June 2, from 9 a.m.-noon, at Lil’ Mart, 1026 Lewiston Road, Route 100, New Gloucester. Plants of all varieties including perennials, annuals, house plants, vegetables and herbs will be offered at bargain prices.

A raffle to win a $75 gift certificate at the Fishermen’s Net in Gray is being held in conjunction with the plant sale. The ticket cost is $3 for one or $5 for two. The drawing will be held at noon that day; you need not be present to win. For more information, or to donate plants, contact Penny Hilton at 926-4004.

Local artists help bring library back to its original glory

Augusta- Lithgow Public Library’s reading room had a secret, but not the kind found in mystery books or even a diary.

It’s hiding underneath multiple layers of paint and broken plaster from previous restoration efforts done over the last 122 years. Keep reading

Mainers and the Gold Rush of 1849 — Historical Society Presentation May 17

“Mainers and the Gold Rush of 1849” is the title of the next program of the New Gloucester Historical Society to be held on Thursday, May 17, 2018 at 7 PM  at the New Gloucester Meetinghouse, 389 Intervale Rd. (Route 231). Jan Eakins from the Maine Historical Society is writing a book on this subject and will talk about some of the people from New Gloucester who headed west during the Gold Rush. Free and open to the public. Refreshments served.

Term limits raised again at town meeting

Voters signed off on the coming year’s budget at the annual town meeting in New Gloucester Monday night, but not without some renewed debate over Selectboard term limits and firefighter compensation.

The $4.4 million fiscal year 2019 expense budget will result in an estimated 3.6 percent increase in the municipal portion of the tax rate over the current year, according to budget materials provided by the town for the May 7.

Coupled with expected SAD 15 and Cumberland County tax increases, the town projects the overall tax rate will increase 4 percent in 2019 from $15.60 per $1,000 valuation to $16.30. Keep reading

Voters pass 2018-19 budget at May 7 town meeting

Voters at last Monday night’s annual town meeting approved all articles, including $142,560 for portable air packs for the Fire Department and $150,000 for a dump/plow truck.

Other expenditures authorized were $30,000 for a second exit for the library, $35,000 for bridge and dam engineering at Stevens Brook, and $37,500 for improvements to the Rowe Station Road tennis courts.

Voters rejected an amendment to the Management of Tax-Liened Property Ordinance, 26-47, which would have eliminated a payment plan for delinquent taxpayers. Keep reading

Patti’s May 11 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Serenity Klotzle, 7, who belongs to the New Gloucester Public Library’s 4-H group, covers the root ball of a newly planted Liberty Elm tree that she named “Elmie” on April 29. Her 5-year-old sister Haven looks on.

Liberty Elm takes root

The image of majestic elm trees arching over the streets of our hometowns changed significantly in the 1930s when Dutch elm disease decimated the elm population. Because of efforts by the nonprofit Elm Research Institute, disease-resistant trees have been developed. They have been given the moniker of the American Liberty Elm — named for the “Liberty Tree,” our country’s first symbol of freedom. The institute established its Liberty Tree Society program in 2009, and of the hundreds of thousands elms they have planted, 99 percent have survived.

New Gloucester Public Library purchased an elm from the Liberty Tree Society in Keene, New Hampshire. Trustee Robb Cotiaux traveled there to pick up the tree for planting, and he along with library 4-H member Serenity Klotzle installed the sapling on April 29. “Elmie” can be visited behind the gazebo and swing set.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to: http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-142/

 

 

Voters to decide on town budget at town meeting Monday

Voters at Saturday’s annual town meeting will decide on buying a plow truck, building a second exit for the library and improving tennis courts.

The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. Monday at Memorial School, with voter registration at 6:30 p.m.

Among the spending proposals are purchasing self-contained breathing apparatus for the Fire Department, construction of a second exit for the New Gloucester Public Library, buying a dump/plow truck and making improvements to the Rowe Station tennis courts. Keep reading

Planning board to continue site review for treatment facility

The Planning Board will continue deliberations on a site plan for a proposed residential drug treatment facility for boys and men ages 14 to 20 at  7 p.m. Tuesday, May 15.

Townspeople have expressed concerns about safety, neighborhood compatibility, well water drawdown and the interpretation that the facility matches use standards in ordinance language.

Day One propose to close its Hollis location and open a 12-bed facility at the 934 Intervale Road home and former law office with 6 acres. Planning