Category Archives: News

Patti’s April 13 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Ice out in the Pineland Pond can’t come quickly enough for these mallards enjoying a brisk swim alongside a frozen slab on April 5. Photo by Patti Mikkelsen

“Fueling Our Schools”

Customers of the Circle K convenience store at 255 Shaker Road in Gray are invited to a special Fuel Up Night to kick off Circle K’s annual “Fueling Our Schools” fundraising campaign. The ongoing campaign invites customers to purchase fuel at specially marked pumps, with Circle K donating one cent of every gallon of fuel purchased to Gray-New Gloucester High School, up to $2,000. The school will use its donation to address different areas of need, such as technology, resources, teacher incentives and more.

On Thursday, April 19, a special Fuel Up Night, customers will have an opportunity to make an even greater impact. From 3-8 p.m., 10 cents of each gallon of fuel sold at pumps seven and eight will be donated to Gray-New Gloucester High School.

“Circle K is passionate about giving back to the neighborhoods where we work and live,” said Jeff Burrell, vice president of Global Fuels. “Through this unique fundraising program, we are helping to address critical needs and enabling educators to make a difference in the classroom and beyond.”

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-140/

Brakey’s campaign files lawsuit against his primary rival

Maine lawsuit challenges Senate candidacy of Republican who used invalid signatures

By Scott Thistle

State Sen. Eric Brakey’s campaign political director, David Boyer, filed a complaint Tuesday, asking a judge in Kennebec County Superior Court to overrule a decision by Secretary of State Matt Dunlap that allowed Brakey’s Republican rival, Max Linn, to remain on the June 12 primary ballot.

Last week, Dunlap invalidated more than 200 voter signatures on Linn’s nomination petition after Brakey’s campaign complained that some of the signatures were either forgeries or from dead voters.

Linn, a financial planner from Bar Harbor, has claimed that Brakey’s campaign planted the fake signatures in an attempt to discredit his campaign. However, Dunlap said he found no evidence of that when he determined Linn still had enough valid signatures to remain on the ballot.

“(Dunlap) threw out all the signatures on petitions where we had a 100 percent confirmed case of fraud and forgery but you have many more petitions by those same circulators who, the Secretary of State found, lied under oath, forged signatures and committed fraud and yet he let all their remaining signatures count without any additional scrutiny whatsoever,” said Brakey, of Auburn. “I think we demonstrated that this wasn’t just a case here and there of fraud and forgery, this was a really systemic problem throughout.”

Brakey said Dunlap should have invalidated all the signatures gathered by any of the circulators who had fake signatures on their petitions.

A U.S. Senate candidate in Maine needs the valid signatures of 2,000 voters to make the ballot.

After a hearing with Linn and Brakey’s election teams, Dunlap found 230 signatures on Linn’s petition were either invalid or forgeries. But Dunlap also confirmed that Linn still had 2,018 valid signatures – 18 more than needed.

Linn said Tuesday that he predicted Brakey would take the issue to the courts.

“I’m not surprised at this political stunt, as Eric’s open borders-pro drugs message is failing with the voters,” Linn said in a prepared statement. “Secretary Dunlap is a person of integrity and he and his staff serve the State of Maine with great distinction. It saddens me that Eric has decided to spit in their face. My campaign moves forward with the Maine Now Agenda.”

Morrison Center opens its doors in New Gloucester

A Maine organization that supports people with disabilities is opening its doors at two residential homes on Short Bennett Road.

The Morrison Center, a non-profit based in Scarborough and Wells, purchased the roughly 20 acres of property from Wayfinder Schools at the former Opportunity Farm.

The two homes will be used as residential housing for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities and autism spectrum disorder, according to a Morrison Center press release. Keep reading

Q&A with Steve Chandler about land donation

Steve Chandler says that his family has owned land in New Gloucester since before the American Revolution, and after years of deliberation, has decided to donate more than 2,000 acres in town to the Maine Woodland Owners land trust.

It was a joint decision from Chandler, his wife Natalie, and cousins Charles and Bertha Chandler, who currently manage the family’s land holdings under the Chandler Brothers name. Keep reading

No verdict yet from appeals board on Day One

A near-capacity crowd filled the New Gloucester Meetinghouse Wednesday night for a more than two-hour meeting that yielded plenty of public comment, but no definitive answer from the Board of Appeals on a proposed youth substance abuse treatment facility.

Non-profit organization Day One has proposed a 12-bed residential treatment facility for young men ages 14-20 at 934 Intervale Road, and several residents have appealed a determination from town Code Enforcement Officer Debra Parks Larrivee that the proposal is an approved use subject to site review by the Planning Board.Keep reading

Planson International of New Gloucester wins business award

Maine International Trade Center (MITC) is announcing the winners of the 2018 International Trade and Investment Awards. Maine companies are being recognized for their commitment to grow their business in international markets. Last year, 2,262 Maine companies exported $2.7 billion in goods and services to 176 countries.

“We’re excited to announce this year’s award winners,” MITC President Wade Merritt said. “These four companies produce world-class Maine products or deliver innovative solutions overseas while supporting hundreds of jobs here in the state.”….

Service Provider of the Year – Planson International, New Gloucester

The Service Provider of the Year Award is presented to a service provider that has established an international presence for the export of their service.

In a red barn in rural New Gloucester, Maine, a $52 million company supplies IT equipment and services to over 150 countries across the globe. Planson International was started 25 years ago by Connie Justice out of her home. Today it employs 45 people, mostly in Maine, with a subsidiary in Denmark.

Planson International works with the United Nations and other humanitarian organizations for projects in developing countries, supporting food security, health, education, children, peacekeeping, conservation, refugee resettlement, and emergency response to natural disasters. Last year, Planson successfully completed a $26 million contract to supply computer labs to 889 high schools across the Philippines. Planson ensures all hardware and software is configured to meet the customer’s needs before it is shipped to places like Afghanistan or Burundi.

“Receiving this award underscores our company commitment to provide solutions, not simply sell goods. Efficiently sourcing and consolidating IT equipment, shipping it safely to customers in high risk regions, making sure it all works correctly under difficult conditions, and partnering with local companies to support our customers is a complex bundle of services. It is an honor to be recognized for this,” said Connie Justice, Planson International CEO.

Read entire article

Republican primary for U.S. Senate

Signatures of dead voters won’t keep U.S. Senate candidate off Maine primary ballot

Max Linn turned in enough valid petition signatures to run against Eric Brakey in the Republican primary, even though 230 of those signatures were declared invalid.

Republican U.S. Senate candidate Max Linn, right, has said his petition was “sabotaged” by the campaign of his primary opponent, state Sen. Eric Brakey, left. Maine’s secretary of state says there’s no evidence of that.

AUGUSTA — Although Maine Secretary of State Matt Dunlap ruled that more than 200 signatures on Max Linn’s candidate petition were invalid, including several that belonged to people who died years ago, he said Thursday that the Republican U.S. Senate candidate turned in enough valid signatures to remain on the June primary ballot.

The campaign of state Sen. Eric Brakey of Auburn, the other Republican on the ballot, filed a complaint against Linn’s campaign in March after it discovered the signatures of dead voters. The two are vying for the chance to challenge incumbent U.S. Sen. Angus King, an independent, in November.

For the complete story in the Portland Press Herald, go to https://www.pressherald.com/2018/04/05/u-s-senate-candidate-stays-on-ballot-despite-signatures-of-dead-voters/

 

NG Board strikes term limit ordinance

By Matt Junker

NEW GLOUCESTER — The term limit ordinance passed by voters at last May’s town meeting didn’t survive a full year, with the Selectboard voting 3-2 Monday night to find it legally invalid.

For the complete story in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/new-gloucester-board-strikes-term-limit-ordinance/

 

 

 

BOS votes 3-2 to overturn term limits for themselves

At their meeting Monday night, the Board of Selectmen voted 3 to 2 to overturn term limits for themselves. The item, which had not been on the public agenda, was introduced by Carrie Castonguay, town manager, after the meeting was underway. Head Selectwoman Linda Chase had contacted her Monday morning and asked her to consult with the Maine Municipal Association for a legal opinion on term limits, and the MMA attorney said she believed that a town charter was required for this to take effect. Vice-chair Steve Libby moved to uphold the MMA legal opinion  and invalidate term limits, and directed the town manager to consult with the town’s attorney and report back to the board.

Action to establish term limits was introduced by citizen petition last year, and the town’s attorney reviewed and approved the language for the ordinance that was approved by voters 60 to 40-% at the 2017 town meeting. Linda Chase, who took out nomination papers despite being termed out of office this spring, voted along with Steve Libby and Lenora Conger to invalidate the ordinance. Libby and Conger’s terms would have been limited in 2019. Steve Hawthorne and Joe Davis were opposed. Watch the video of the meeting from about 58:00-1:14. (If you have trouble viewing the video from the link, go directly to the town website at www.newglocuester.com, scroll town on the left side to Public Cable video to find the April 2 Selectmen’s meeting.)

GNG students at science fair

GNG students and their science fair projects were featured on the front page of Country Connections this week.