Category Archives: NG History

Patti’s Nov. 10 “Inside New Gloucester”

Get Out! Nature Walk

Get Out! Nature Walks are volunteer-led regular trips with trained master naturalists and other skilled volunteer leaders. Join them for a well-planned, no-cost, guided adventure occurring once-per-month on Wednesdays, rain, snow or shine. Their programs are jointly offered by the Chebeague and Cumberland Land Trust, as well as the Royal River Conservation Trust.

Be mindful of the weather and dress accordingly. Bring appropriate gear, snacks and a thermos or water bottle. Check www.rrct.org for any updates or changes. Nature walks typically involve getting on your knees with a hand lens or standing still for 10 minutes craning up at a treetop. Trips are great for kids, but inappropriate for those under age 6. Their curriculum is targeted at adults and engaged youth. Because the purpose is nature observation, please don’t bring dogs.

The next Get Out! Nature Walk takes place on Wednesday, Nov. 15, from 1:30 to 3 p.m. at Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village, 707 Shaker Road. The curriculum is Winter Weeds, led by volunteer Karen Herold. She is a Natural Resources Council of Maine board member.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to: http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-130/

Patti’s Sept. 1 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

making a card

Kaidan Marchand, 5, of Gorham, makes a get well card for Ava Winslow, who is battling osteosarcoma, during the Gray-New Gloucester Rallies for Ava fundraiser on Aug. 26. He became acquainted with Ava when they both attended Rise and Shine Childcare and said that she is his best friend.

Digital photo workshop

Sabbathday Lake’s Brother Delmer Wilson (1873-1961) launched his photography hobby in 1898 with glass plate negatives and using all types of film through his life, including color Polaroid.

At a workshop at Shaker Village on Saturday, Sept. 16, New Gloucester photographer Vicki Lund will show participants how to create a great shot using the features of their digital cameras. She will teach camera operation/functions, use of natural light, composition, raw versus jpeg file formats, and white balance. After a brief class, you will explore the grounds of Shaker Village, photographing along the way, then returning to the class for critique.

The workshop will be held from 1-4 p.m. Please bring your camera manual, SD card, fresh batteries and, if you have one, a tripod. Pre-registration is required, and the fee is $50. Class size is limited to 12. Register online at www.maineshakers.com/workshops or call 926-4597 to reserve a spot.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to: http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-120/

Patti’s Aug. 4 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Inside New Gloucester – Keep Me Current

4-H’ers to help pantries

Cumberland County 4-H members Caleb and Katie McGrath-Holmquist and Amber, Amanda and Austin Holmes are raising money to buy three market hogs and three market lambs from the Cumberland Fair 4-H Livestock Auction on Wednesday Sept. 27, at the Cumberland Fairgrounds. The livestock will be donated to the Gray and New Gloucester Food Pantries.

The two families are longtime members of the Cumberland County 4-H Sheep Club and the 4-H Swiners Club who raise market lambs and hogs to be sold annually at the fair’s 4-H auction. This year, in addition to raising and auctioning their own animals, they are participating in a self-designed community service project to benefit both 4-H’ers and their local food pantries.

They hope to raise $3,600 to buy the animals. They will be selling donated water, soda and lemonade at the Gray Blueberry Festival on Saturday Aug. 12, from 9:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Pennell Municipal Complex, 24 Main St., Gray.

Donations of any amount can be sent to GNG 4-H Food Pantry Project, P.O. Box 1012, Gray, Maine 04039. Checks can be made payable to: GNG 4-H Food Pantry Project.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-118/

The Evolution of the NG Fire Department, Part I: Following Smoke

 

By Penny Hilton
July 2017

A Several Part Series on the evolution of the New Gloucester Fire Department from the early 20th century to the present. Part One, 1899 – 1939, is history as interpreted through annual town reports of New Gloucester, Gray, and Auburn; New Gloucester Town Meeting Minutes; books on the history of these towns, plus Pownal; a number of articles and data from the State of Maine and other reputable on-line resources. Corrections and additions are welcomed. While not a source for the information below, Acadia Transformed: New Gloucester, Maine and the Rise of the City, 1740 to 1930 by Geoffrey Rosanno, was extremely helpful in confirming some of my conclusions, and a fascinating examination of New Gloucester.

The town of New Gloucester at the turn of the last century was a well-established rural community which had evolved from agrarian self-sufficiency to being part of the complex network of rural towns supplying the metropolitan centers of Portland and Lewiston Auburn with dairy and farm products, workers, and new customers. With many farms, more well-acred “homesteads”, some mills, a blacksmith, three churches and several one-room schoolhouses, New Gloucester spread over 47 square miles, with a sparse network of dirt roads connecting everyone. The town was governed by a board of three selectmen who were elected at the annual town meeting, when all the town’s most important decisions were made. As revealed in town reports down through the years, these voters were not a hasty bunch. They were inclined to put new ideas on hold at town meeting for several years before finally discarding an unpopular notion, or, in some cases, voting yes. One of the ideas that took years to become accepted as a  routine town matter was municipal fire protection.  Continue reading

Patti’s April 28 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Historic sign to be unveiled

A special monthly History Barn Open House will take place on Saturday, May 6, from 9 a.m.-noon. At 10 a.m., the original 1776 Bell Tavern Sign, which is a gift from the Chandler Family, will be unveiled. It will hang in the barn as part of the New Gloucester Historical Society’s permanent exhibit.

The public is welcome to attend the open house and learn about the historic tavern. Refreshments, featuring goat cheese, or chèvre, from New Gloucester’s Lazy Dog Farm Creamery, and other tasty treats, will be served next door in the Community Building located at 381 Intervale Road, behind Town Hall.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-101/

Patti’s March 31 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Welcome, Neighbor crew Feb 20 2016

Welcome, Neighbor volunteers Kathleen Potter, front left, Penny Hilton, Beth Blakeman-Pohl and Beth Birch finish assembling packets of materials last year to be given out to new residents of New Gloucester. The Welcome, Neighbor group is in the process of assembling new packets.

Welcome, Neighbor provides free publicity

Local businesses and organizations can obtain free publicity by participating in Welcome, Neighbor, a grassroots community volunteer project conducted in conjunction with the town office. The project was developed to welcome new residents to New Gloucester by providing information that may assist in their transition.

Only New Gloucester-based businesses, organizations and community groups have the opportunity to include items, such as business cards, brochures or other promotional materials, in the 100 packets to be assembled. There’s no charge or obligation to participate. Drop off 100-count of your item to the town office by Friday, April 7, to have your materials included. For more information, call Beth at 650-5228.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-100/

Patti’s Feb. 3 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Pisgah Hill Full Moon Trek

Join members and supporters of the Royal River Conservation Trust on Friday, Feb. 10, from 5-8 p.m., for the free, sixth annual full moon snowshoe evening at Pisgah Hill Preserve south trailhead, 74 Dougherty Road, near the New Gloucester-Pownal town line. Climb to the summit of Pisgah Hill Preserve through the setting sun to witness the rising of the full snow moon. Enjoy a warming campfire and mingle with your friends, old and new.

The trail is well marked and typically lighted with luminaries for the return. Organizers recommend bringing snowshoes, poles, a flashlight or headlamp, blanket, water and lots of good cheer. The trailhead has a small parking lot which fills quickly. Most vehicles are asked to line the shoulder of Dougherty Road. For more details, see www.rrct.org.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-81/

Patti’s Nov. 11 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

quilters

Sharon Vandermay, left, and Ellie Fellers, both of New Gloucester, stand against a backdrop of one of Fellers’ quilts and Vandermay’s prayer flags, which are on display at Norumbega Yurts, 380 Woodman Road.

Prayer flag workshop

Sharon Vandermay, president of the Maine Modern Quilt Guild, will lead a prayer flag workshop, from 10 a.m.-noon, Saturday, Nov. 19, at Norumbega Yurts, 380 Woodman Road. Prayer flags are created with simple designs and hung outside – preferable in a high location. It is said that the positive energy of the flags, coupled with the natural energy of the wind, quietly harmonizes the environment, impartially increasing happiness and good fortune among all living things.

Workshop participants will make their own squares for a prayer flag. The cost is $20, and materials will be provided. To register, contact Julie Fralich at 653-4823 or j.fralich@gmail.com.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-67/

Patti’s Sept. 30 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Shaker Village Harvest Festival

Join the fun at Shaker Village for the end-of-season Fall Harvest Festival, from 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 8. Freshly picked apples from the historic Shaker orchards will be offered for sale along with free cider pressing, homemade Shaker apple fritters and much more.

Chipman’s Farm, neighbors to the Shakers since the 1790s, will have a bounty available for sale. Seasonal mums, other late-season bloomers and houseplants will be featured in a booth hosted by Donna’s Greenhouses of New Gloucester.

Free, traditional craft demonstrations will include Shaker-style broom making by Kent Ruesswick; wool carding, spinning, knitting and weaving by R&R Spinners; rug hooking by Parris House Wool Works; blacksmithing by Tim Greene; weaving by Marjie Thompson, wood-turning by Peter Asselyn and wood-carving by the Poland Woodcarvers. Books will be signed by authors Don Perkins, “Barns of Maine,” and Chris Becksvoort, “The Shaker Legacy.”

Free wagon rides will be offered throughout the day. Kids will be treated to free face painting and free gourd decorating.

All activities will take place on the grounds of Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village and inside the Shakers’ historic 1830 barns. The village is located at 707 Shaker Road, off Route 26, New Gloucester. The festival will be held rain or shine.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-50/

Patti’s Sept. 2 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Hike for Ike

New Gloucester resident Isaac Blake, 16, lives with type 1 diabetes (T1D), and he is taking steps to fight this disease. He invites people to donate to his “Hike for Ike” team and/or join the team in the JDRF Walk to Cure Diabetes on Sunday, Sept. 18, at Thornton Academy, 438 Main St., Saco. Registration opens at 10 a.m., and the 5K walk starts at 11 a.m.

His mother Shelley Blake reports, “Technology has advanced and helped with managing T1D. I’ve gone from checking Isaac’s blood sugar (he can sleep right through it) 2-3 times a night, to looking at my phone, which displays his blood sugar, and going back to sleep if it is ‘in target.’ It’s not perfect and life will never be as seemingly carefree as it was before age 12, but technology, like the Dexcom (continuous glucose monitor) help ease the burden of daily life with T1D.”

To donate or join the team, go to walk.jdrf.org, enter your zip code, click on Saco, ME, and search for the Hike for Ike team.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-44/