Category Archives: Regulars

Patti’s Sept. 28 Inside New Gloucester Column

Rupert Watson, left, Tom Blake, Phil Blake and David Watson, along with others, met Sept. 19  at the New Gloucester Veterans Monument to see the inscription for the Watsons’ uncle, a British WW II pilot in the Royal Navy who perished over the skies of New Gloucester during training maneuvers in 1943.

1943 air crash memorialized

Tragedy struck over the skies of New Gloucester’s Intervale region 75 years ago.

On Oct. 3, 1943, British pilots Lieutenant Commander Alfred Jack Sewell and Sub-Lieutenant David James Falshaw Watson took off from Brunswick Naval Air Station to practice training maneuvers. Apparently one plane came up under the other, causing a collision that resulted in the deaths of both pilots.

Rupert and David Watson learned about the tribute to their uncle through internet research. When Rupert and his wife, who are from New Zealand, were visiting his brother David in New York, they decided to visit the Veterans Monument. They contacted Jean Libby from the Veterans Monument Committee in advance.

On Sept. 19, Phil Blake’s son, Tom, presided over a gathering of the three members of the Watson family, plus 20 New Gloucester Historical Society members and local dignitaries to honor pilot David James Falshaw Watson and present the trio with memorabilia from the monument’s dedication ceremony in 2014.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-152/

 

Patti’s Aug. 3 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Joanne Mason, of Hanover, who is a Maine Adaptive Sports & Recreation multi-season volunteer, practices backhand drills last week during wheelchair tennis lessons at Pineland Farms’ courts.

Wheelchair tennis at Pineland

Maine Adaptive provides year-round programs promoting adaptive sports and recreation for those with disabilities ages 4 and up who live in or visit Maine. All of the lessons and programs are free of charge for participants.

Staff members and volunteers offer wheelchair and stand-up tennis drills and match play at Pineland Farms and Gould Academy as one of their summer programs. Competitors don’t need to have their own equipment. Maine Adaptive has equipment to fit many shapes and sizes.

One of the wheelchair tennis programs occurred at the courts at Pineland Farms on July 27. John Pelletier, of Westport, Massachusetts, who owns a camp in the town of Denmark, said that he has been playing and teaching wheelchair tennis for several years. He instructs participants by starting with forehand and backhand drills, then progressing into service practice. After these disciplines are performed, the players break into groups to compete in match play.

Brandon Merry, Maine Adaptive program manager, said wheelchair tennis takes place in collaboration with the Veterans Adaptive Sports & Training program at Pineland Farms since some of the Maine Adaptive participants are veterans. The upcoming schedule for wheelchair tennis at Pineland Farms is Monday, Aug. 6; Friday, Aug. 24; and Friday, Sept. 14.”

Those interested in competing or volunteering can check Guidelines for Participation at maineadaptive.org. The necessary forms are posted there as well. For more information, call Maine Adaptive’s office at (800) 639-7770.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to: http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-148/

 

PAINTCARE

PAINTCARE

Have you heard of a program called Paintcare?

Now you can get rid of all that paint that you no longer want or need and do so environmentally. This will also reduce the tonnage of the compacter at the transfer station thus saving the town money and help reduce your taxes.

Have you purchased paint in the last few years? If so, you are helping to pay for this program. A fee is added to each can of paint you purchase: 35 cents for less than a gallon, 75 cents for a gallon. This fee is NOT refundable but is used to support the program.

The purpose of the program is to conserve resources, reduce waste and to recycle as much paint as possible. To date 9 states are participating in the program.

Paint is collected and sent to a facility that processes it so it can be reused. Latex, acrylic, oil based paints, primers, stains, metal coating paints plus others are accepted. Cans have to have labels on them and cans cannot be rusty, leaking or paint dried out. It does not matter how old, moldy or dirty the paint is.

To check what is accepted, go to this web site:
PAINTCARE.ORG
All you have to do is take the paint to a drop off site. Please check with the site for drop off times and hours or days as sometimes their bins are filled waiting for pickup of paint ready to be recycled. Sites available in this immediate area are:
Sherwin Williams Auburn 753-7373
Sherwin Williams Lewiston 784-2939
Environmental Projects Inc. 664 N. Washington ST Auburn
8-1pm M-F 786-7390

Environmental Resource Comm. of New Gloucester
7/23/18

Patti’s June 8 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Don Densmore of New Gloucester, a member of a volunteer construction team, works on the roof of the pavilion at the New Gloucester Fairgrounds on June 2. The pavilion is perched at the highest point of land in the area to afford parents a sentry post to keep an eye out for their children participating in recreational activities at the playground and athletic fields.

Fire-rescue open house

New Gloucester Fire-Rescue will be sponsoring an open house from 5-7 p.m. on Monday, June 18. All community members are invited to attend. Complimentary food will be served, demonstrations will be performed, and a baseball hat for each of the first 50 kids will be given out.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-144/

 

How to Get Rid Of Brown Tail Moth Nests

How to Get Rid of Brown Tail Moth Caterpillar Nests

This is the time of the year to check your yards and surrounding areas for brown tail moth webs. Destroy the webs now. At this stage, they do not cause an allergic reaction as they will later in the season.
A video on how to destroy the nests at this time of the year may be viewed on the internet at the Maine Forest Service web site. Enter Brown tail moth in the search box.

Environmental Resources Committee of New Gloucester 4/28/2018

BROWNTAIL MOTH
Euproctis chrysorrhoea (L.)

The browntail moth is an insect of forest and human health concern which was accidently introduced into Somerville, Massachusetts from Europe in 1897.  By 1913, the insect had spread to all of the New England states and New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.  Since that time, populations of this pest slowly decreased due to natural controls until the 1960’s, when browntail moth was limited to Cape Cod and a few islands off the Maine coast in Casco Bay. Browntail moth populations persist on islands and in coastal areas in southern Maine, extending up the river valleys.
Browntail Moth Risk Map (pdf | 2MB) The larval stage (caterpillar) of this insect feeds on the foliage of hardwood trees and shrubs including:  oak, shadbush, apple, cherry, beach plum, and rugosa rose.  Larval feeding causes reduction of growth and occasional mortality of valued trees and shrubs.  While feeding damage may cause some concern, the primary concern is the impact on humans from the browntail moth is the result of contact with poisonous hairs found on the caterpillars.  Contact of these hairs with human skin causes a rash similar to poison ivy that can be severe on some individuals.

Burn Permits Required

We hope this information provided will help you, if more info is needed please call us here at the station with any questions, tips or concerns.
Non emergency: 207-926-4962
Thank you!

The MAINE FOREST SERVICE
FIRE WEATHER / FIRE DANGER site has been upgraded, please visit their site for everything you need to know for a safe burning season this year.

The color coded fire danger map is here >>

http://mainefireweather.org/index.php

Towns listed alphabetically with “new zone numbers.” New Gloucester used to be zone 1 & 3, we are now “zone 9”

http://www.maine.gov/…/Fire%20Weather%20Zones%20by%20Town.p…

On days when burning will be allowed permits MUST be issued either by obtaining one directly from the New Gloucester Fire Rescue or online for your connivence at

https://www13.informe.org/burnpermit/public/index.html

Recent wildfire training conducted by New Gloucester Fire Fighters.

Comprehensive Plan Update Committee

 The Comprehensive Plan Update Committee is working on updating the Town’s Comprehensive Plan.   
If you want to receive regular email updates on the progress of the update committee’s work email Scott Hastings, the town planner, at shastings@newgloucester.com

Why have and update a Comprehensive Plan?
A town’s comprehensive plan takes stock of where the town is and then sets goals for where the town’s residents want it to be.  New Gloucester last updated our comprehensive plan in 1990.   A lot has changed since then.  An update lets us find out exactly what has happened in town and see how we are doing on the goals that were in that plan.
The comprehensive plan process is also a chance for all of us to get together and really talk about our town.   What do we like about New Gloucester? What might we like to change? Where do we want to be in the future?  We will talk about all of these things and create new goals as part of the updated plan.
A current comprehensive plan also has certain legal and regulatory benefits.  The state requires plans to be updated every 10 years and meet certain standards.  Plans that meet these requirements are the legal basis for enforceable municipal zoning rules.  They also qualify towns for preferred status when commenting for state grants and working with state departments.
For more information on comprehensive plans, the rules and laws governing them here in Maine, and approved plans from other municipalities go to Maine’s page on comprehensive plans.
Please contact Scott Hastings, Town Planner, with any comments or questions:
Email: shastings@newgloucester.com
Phone: (207)926-4126

Patti’s Feb. 2 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Veterans monument update

The New Gloucester Historical Society, assisted by many people, established a “Veterans Honor Roll” with more than 875 names of veterans with ties to New Gloucester, starting with the Revolutionary War up to present day.

To add a veteran’s name to the monument or to purchase an engraved brick, obtain a form at the Town Hall, email Jean Libby at jelibby8@maine.rr.com, or write the New Gloucester Historical Society, P.O. Box 531, New Gloucester, ME 04260. The deadline is Wednesday, Feb. 28.

Neighborhood nostalgia

The next monthly meeting of the New Gloucester Historical Society will feature a workshop for all members and friends who are interested in researching their New Gloucester neighborhood and/or historic home. The research will be used in a major new exhibit opening in May 2018. The workshop will be held on Thursday, Feb. 15, 7 p.m. at the New Gloucester Meetinghouse, 389 Intervale Road. Refreshments will be served.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-feb-2/

 

An Exhibit about Composting is on display at the New Gloucester Library for the month of February

 

Do you know how to compost?

Learn how easy it is to do and save money as well as enrich your garden soils.

Composting can also save the town money by reducing the amount of tonnage that goes in the hopper. To transport the material in the hopper costs the town over $41 per ton.

30% t0 40 % of material that goes into the hopper is organic matter that could be composted.

For the year of 2017, 30% of the tonnage in New Gloucester’s hopper equals 410 tons. At $41 per ton for disposal of just organic matter, the cost to the town was $16.810!

Learn more about how easy it is to compost by visiting the display during February at the New Gloucester Library.

There is material to take home as well as a drawing for a compost bucket with liners for those that fill out a very short survey about composting.

New Gloucester Environmental Resource Committee
February 2018

Ban on Invasive Plants Sold in Maine

33 Invasive Plants Prohibited from Sale in Maine as of January 1, 2018

What you need to Know.

A list of plants that it is illegal to import, sell, export, buy or intentionally propagate as January 1, 2018 can be found on the following web site. The ban includes the listed species and all cultivars, varieties and hybrids.

www.maine.gov/hort

Look under “Invasive Plants” when the page comes up. Botanical as well as common names are listed.

Local nurseries are aware of the ban and will not sell you these but you may already have them in your yard and might consider replacing them with a non-invasive.

They may also be available from out of state nurseries so recheck the list before ordering from them.

At the bottom of the list of invasive plants are several links to plants that are alternates to invasive plants.

When attending a plant sale in the community, be aware of the list and also make the seller aware of this ban.

Environmental Resource Committee of New Gloucester
12/22/17