Category Archives: Other

Snowdrops!

Snowdrops by Kevyn Fowler, April 3, 2019

Casco Bay CAN Tip of the Month: Prescription Drug Safety

The spring equinox is Wednesday: 7 things to know about the first day of spring

A brief, scientific guide to the first day of spring.

The vernal equinox is upon us: On Wednesday, March 20, both the Northern and Southern hemispheres will experience an equal amount of daylight. For those of us in the Northern Hemisphere, it marks the beginning of spring, with daylight hours continuing to lengthen until the summer solstice in June. (Google is marking the first day of spring with a Google Doodle.) For those south of the equator, it’s the beginning of autumn. Keep reading Brian Resnick’s article on VOX.

Why you should experiment with hugelkultur in your garden

Most gardeners are accustomed to using a single method of gardening, maybe a plot or a raised bed. There are so many different gardening methods around the world, though, and some of them may help you grow better where you are.

One such method is hugelkultur, which translates to “mound culture” or “hill culture” in German, is a method of planting that involves growing plants on a mound of decaying material. Keep reading Sam Schiapani’s article in the Bangor Daily News.

One Quick Correction to a Recent Post

Hope to see you at the St. Patrick’s Day breakfast at the Eagles Club by Sabbathday Lake this SUNDAY, March 17th from 8-11 am for a hearty breakfast. (Peter’s post was great, but unfortunately he mentioned that the breakfast would be on Saturday, which is incorrect.) See you there!

Patti’s March 15 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Frank Matzke of St. Augustine, Florida, uses adaptive ski equipment to compete in the VAST Fifth Annual Nordic Biathlon Camp at Pineland Farms on March 3.

VAST biathlon camp

The VAST Fifth Annual Nordic Biathlon Camp at Pineland Farms Feb. 28-March 4 attracted 16 competitors from California, Oregon, Florida and throughout New England. According to organizer Kristina Sabasteanski, one entrant was nearly 100 percent visually impaired, four have undergone amputations, several deal with traumatic brain injuries, some have PTSD and others received injuries from improvised explosive device blasts in Middle Eastern war zones. A few of the participants had never skied before the event but managed to hone their skills enough to compete in relay races testing their cross-country ski and target shooting abilities.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-164/

 

Patti’s Feb. 15 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

A horse-drawn sleigh owned by Stillbrook Acres delights passengers with a jaunt over the undulating, snow-covered terrain at Pineland Farms. All rides are sold out this year for this popular event.

Full Moon Trek

Join RRCT members, neighbors, trustees, toddlers, grandparents and friends to hike the loop trail during the eighth annual Pisgah Hill Full Moon Trek from 5-8 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 19. The highlight is a bonfire at the summit where hikers can sip hot cocoa, toast marshmallows and hoot or howl at the big orange rising moon.

All the fun happens at Pisgah Hill Preserve, 74 Dougherty Road, near the Pownal town line. Plan to start your approximately 30-minute hike between 5 and 6:30 p.m. on a 1.5-mile lollipop-style loop trail. The path is well-marked and typically lighted with luminaries for the return. Gentle elevation rise and a rickety bridge on the trail require some effort; assistance for the elderly or toddlers may be required for one or two steep ledge steps.

Bring snowshoes or sturdy boots with grippers, poles, a flashlight or headlamp, a blanket, water and lots of good cheer. Marshmallows and more are provided at this free event. The trailhead has a small parking lot which fills quickly. Most vehicles line the shoulder of Dougherty Road.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-162/

 

New Gloucester Citizens for a Town Charter

PRESS RELEASE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 8, 2019

Contact: Steve Hathorne

210-5423

New Gloucester Citizens for a Town Charter

New Gloucester residents met recently to create a citizens’ action committee, New Gloucester Citizens for Town Charter to promote the creation of a Charter Commission, a question which will be put to a town-wide vote on June 11 this year.  Continue reading

Patti’s Feb. 1 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Explore Big Falls Preserve

The Rain or Shine Club has scheduled an outing to explore the Big Falls Preserve at 10 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 7.

The 40-acre preserve at the far end of Woodman Road, straddling the New Gloucester and Auburn line, was donated by Michael and Julie Fralich to the Royal River Conservation Trust in December. It features a scenic waterfall at the mouth of a small wading pool, creating a destination for hikers on a 1.5-mile loop trail. Snowshoes are recommended.

The parking spot is at the junction of Woodman Road and Ayer Road. For more information, contact Kyle Warren at kyle@rrct.org.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-161/

 

Dirty books and filthy laws

Books are dirty. And really good books can be really, really dirty.

When I read about state Rep. Amy Arata’s bill attempting to ban “obscene” booksfrom high school libraries, it made me realize some of the filthiest things I’ve ever read had their genesis in the pages of some of the greatest writing of all time.

Speaking of genesis, let’s start at the beginning. There’s been smut in books since people first started writing them. The first book of the Old Testament starts out with two people buck naked in a garden. With a snake. They eat some fruit, and then make enough babies to start the entire human race. Filthy.

Read the rest of Lance Dutson’s column in the Bangor Daily News.