Author Archives: Patti Mikkelsen

New Gloucester Archives Open House

The archives and library of the New Gloucester Historical Society will be open on Saturday, Dec. 1st from 9 AM to 12 Noon-all local history buffs and family geneologists are invited. The archives and library are located in the New Gloucester Meetinghouse, 389 Intervale Rd. (Route 231), New Gloucester, next to the Town Hall.

Vintage Opportunity Farm newsletters and photos sought

Volunteer archivist with the New Gloucester Historical Society, Rev. Linda Gard, is seeking donations of issues of Opportunity Farm Newsletters published from the 1920s on. The Archives of the New Gloucester Historical Society would like to expand its collection of representative documents from Opportunity Farm’s century of existence. Photographs are also sought. The Historical Society is willing to make scans of photos which you may have but would like to keep. Please contact Rev. Gard at 30 Gloucester Hill Road, New Gloucester, 04260, or pastor@ngucc.org.

Patti’s Nov. 9 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Channel 3 becomes 1302

Effective Nov. 13, local access NGTV Channel 3 will be changed to Channel 1302.
Gray Community TV Channel 2 will be Channel 1301, and Portland’s Community TV Network Channel 5 will be Channel 1303. These channels will be carried in the basic service tier.

Spectrum is converting TV service to 100 percent digital format. Customers will be required to have a Spectrum receiver on each TV. If you have an existing set-top-box, digital transport adapter (DTA), or retail device with a CableCARD on each TV, you will be unaffected by this change. Otherwise, to order your Spectrum receiver(s), go to www.Spectrum.com/digitalnow or call 1-844-278-3409 and a self-installation kit will be shipped to your home at no additional cost. You can also visit the Windham, Saco, Lewiston or Portland Cable Stores to pick up your equipment. Customers are eligible to receive a converter at no additional charge for a limited period of time. If customers have TV(s) without equipment issued by Spectrum, they will lose the ability to view channels.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-155/

 

 

Patti’s Oct. 12 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Susan Percy, director of Smart Child and Family Services, discusses treatment foster care at a community potluck supper Oct. 6 at New Gloucester First Congregational Church.

Treatment foster care talk

Smart Child and Family Services was created in 1995 to support the functioning of foster families. Treatment foster parents provide care for children with emotional and/or behavioral health needs while their families work toward reunifying with them or other permanency options are explored.

Smart CFS Director Susan Percy addressed this topic at a community potluck supper held at the New Gloucester First Congregational Church Vestry on Oct. 6. She explained that the program’s goal is to provide a therapeutic, corrective family experience for children who have lived through abuse, neglect or other trauma. Treatment foster families work with community resources to promote the child’s social and emotional wellbeing.

Regarding eligibility guidelines to become a treatment foster parent, a candidate must be at least 21 years of age and own or rent their home. For more information, contact Percy at the Windham office at 893-0386.

To read Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to: http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-153/

 

Submit your questions and topics for the candidate forum soon!

Debra Smith, left, and Penny Hilton who are members of the Candidate and Referendum Issues Committee set up a table at Thompson’s Orchard on Sept. 30. They are still seeking questions and/or discussion topics from the public for the Oct. 9th legislative candidates forums. Please submit questions and/or discussion topics by Wednesday, Oct. 3 at 10 am by email at newgloucesterquestions@gmail.com.

 

 

 

Clarification regarding town charter process

At their Sept. 17 meeting, the Board of Selectmen tabled action on the issue of putting a question to the NG voters of whether they want to create a charter commission. (Please note that the Sept. 29 post “… whether or not the board would approve forming a charter commission to develop a proposed town charter that would go to voters for approval” is somewhat misleading.)

The action had been tabled until the October 1st Board Meeting pending a request to MMA about the procedure the Board needs to take to put the question on the ballot at the next regular election in June 2019. The Sept. 29 post is correct in stating that the Oct. 1st board meeting was cancelled.

 

 

Patti’s Sept. 28 Inside New Gloucester Column

Rupert Watson, left, Tom Blake, Phil Blake and David Watson, along with others, met Sept. 19  at the New Gloucester Veterans Monument to see the inscription for the Watsons’ uncle, a British WW II pilot in the Royal Navy who perished over the skies of New Gloucester during training maneuvers in 1943.

1943 air crash memorialized

Tragedy struck over the skies of New Gloucester’s Intervale region 75 years ago.

On Oct. 3, 1943, British pilots Lieutenant Commander Alfred Jack Sewell and Sub-Lieutenant David James Falshaw Watson took off from Brunswick Naval Air Station to practice training maneuvers. Apparently one plane came up under the other, causing a collision that resulted in the deaths of both pilots.

Rupert and David Watson learned about the tribute to their uncle through internet research. When Rupert and his wife, who are from New Zealand, were visiting his brother David in New York, they decided to visit the Veterans Monument. They contacted Jean Libby from the Veterans Monument Committee in advance.

On Sept. 19, Phil Blake’s son, Tom, presided over a gathering of the three members of the Watson family, plus 20 New Gloucester Historical Society members and local dignitaries to honor pilot David James Falshaw Watson and present the trio with memorabilia from the monument’s dedication ceremony in 2014.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-152/

 

Shaker Village Harvest Festival

Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village will host its annual Harvest Festival on Saturday, October 6th from 10am – 4:30pm. Bring your family and friends for a day of free barn tours by Brother Arnold Hadd, free wagon rides, and special activities. Freshly-picked apples from the historic Shaker orchards will be offered for sale along with cider-pressing of Shaker apples, homemade Shaker apple and pumpkin donuts, BBQ dinner plates, and much more!

Live Bluegrass music by Albert Price and the Pseudonyms. Chipman’s Farm, neighbors to the Shakers since the 1790s, will have a fresh bounty of seasonal produce for sale, along with preserves and baked goods. Maple syrup and maple candy will be sold by Passamaquoddy Maple from Jackman, Maine. Seasonal mums, other late-season “bloomers” and houseplants will be available from Donna’s Greenhouse.

Free, traditional craft demonstrations include wool fiber spinning, rug hooking and supplies by Parris House Wool Works, blacksmithing by Tim Greene, weaving by Marjie Thompson, wood-turning by Peter Asselyn, and woodcarving by the Poland Woodcarvers. Book signings by Don Perkins — The Barns of Maine, and Chris Becksvoort — The Shaker Legacy. Native American artists and crafters including Lightning Hawk Creations, dolls by Wendy Hamilton, and Passamaquoddy Maple syrup and sugar.

Free wagon rides will be offered throughout the day with free tours of the Shaker Herb Garden. Free face painting for kids along with free gourd decorating! Rain or shine – all activities will be in the Shakers’ historic 1830 barns. The Museum is open for tours as well as the Shaker Store and Museum Gift Shop. Bring the family!

Patti’s Sept. 14 “Inside New Gloucester” Column

Carla McAllister and Tim Rice opened their Dragonfly Farm Little Free Library in early September. Rice built it to resemble the 1893 barn on the premises of their homestead at 585 Shaker Road.  Photo by SallyAnn Rogers

Novel Little Free Library

Little Free Libraries are in 88 countries and number more than 79,000. These  small libraries and can be found along many roads, in parks and at myriad other locations. The concept is for people of all ages to “take a book, share a book.” Courtesy dictates that if you take a book or two, return a book or two to either the location from which you borrowed or to another Little Free Library.

Carla McAllister, assistant librarian at New Gloucester Public Library for nearly 10 years, has had a hankering for an LFL for a few years now. Tim Rice, her husband, made her dream come true by building a LFL that resembles the 1893 barn on the premises of their homestead. Dragonfly Farm Little Free Library is lit so that patrons can stop by after dark to check out what books are offered.

Dragonfly Farm Little Free Library is located at 585 Shaker Road, one-half mile south of Shaker Village. You are invited to take away a book of interest and log comments about the overall concept or their LFL in particular. McAllister and Rice hope that their LFL will be respected, visited often, and fun for all.

For Patti Mikkelsen’s complete column in the Lakes Region Weekly, go to: http://news.keepmecurrent.com/inside-new-gloucester-151/

 

New Gloucester Town News available on town website

The New Gloucester Town News

You may view the 2018 Fall-Winter Edition of the “New Gloucester Town News” by going to http://www.newgloucester.com.

It’s chock full of important news to keep residents apprised of what’s going on in town.

Subscribe today to receive each edition of the newsletter emailed directly to you by sending an email to smyers@newgloucester.com  with the words “subscribe me” in the subject line. The publication is now coming out twice per year.